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Ecclesistical & Heritage World No.91

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Up-to-date lighting shows off church’s stunning features

Dating back to around 1863, St Paul’s Church in Langleybury, Hertfordshire, is a Grade Two*-listed building in the Gothic Revival style, featuring tall proportions and a prominent spire. Inside, a wealth of features include carved angels, which adorn the springings of the arches within the nave, a beautiful carved stone chancel arch, wall paintings, memorials and a stunning timber roof.

The existing lighting within the nave consisted of four outdated wall lights and five suspended pendants, of which one had failed completely. Lighting within the chancel and baptistry had been replaced a few years ago, but consisted of cold, white external floodlights which provided little or no benefit at ground level and gave an overall bleak appearance, which did not complement the surroundings.

0n7424Church Lighting Systems – a division of CLS Electrical Services – provided an initial design, followed by a faculty-ready specification. They were then commissioned to carry out the installation work, which took place over a four week period. All existing light fittings were disconnected and removed, along with the twin-and-earth PVC cabling.

New FP200 cables were installed throughout, along with a new DALI-controlled lighting system. All the lighting now consists of 3,500lm 38W LED luminaires, which have a 3,000k warm white output. As well as general lighting, feature lighting was installed, which illuminates the roof space in all areas of the church. Specific features have also been highlighted, such as the pulpit and lectern, along with the font.

The main focus of the church – which is the altar and sanctuary – has been illuminated using a mixture of wide, medium and narrow beam fittings, specifically directed to provide high illumination within that area and creating a focal point for those looking forward from the nave.

The lighting is operated automatically upon entrance through the south porch. Any one of 10 scenes can then be selected from a simple push-button control plate. Each scene can be programmed to suit the needs of the church. The lighting can also be operated from anywhere within the church using a tablet or mobile phone.

Additional lighting was installed in the kitchen area at the west end of the north aisle and socket outlets installed on each side of the nave.

Dating back to around 1863, St Paul’s Church in Langleybury, Hertfordshire, is a Grade Two*-listed building in the Gothic Revival style, featuring tall proportions and a prominent spire. Inside, a wealth of features include carved angels, which adorn the springings of the arches within the nave, a beautiful carved stone chancel arch, wall paintings, memorials and a stunning timber roof.

For further information visit www.churchlightingsystems.com

The existing lighting within the nave consisted of four outdated wall lights and five suspended pendants, of which one had failed completely. Lighting within the chancel and baptistry had been replaced a few years ago, but consisted of cold, white external floodlights which provided little or no benefit at ground level and gave an overall bleak appearance, which did not complement the surroundings.

Church Lighting Systems – a division of CLS Electrical Services – provided an initial design, followed by a faculty-ready specification. They were then commissioned to carry out the installation work, which took place over a four week period. All existing light fittings were disconnected and removed, along with the twin-and-earth PVC cabling.

New FP200 cables were installed throughout, along with a new DALI-controlled lighting system. All the lighting now consists of 3,500lm 38W LED luminaires, which have a 3,000k warm white output. As well as general lighting, feature lighting was installed, which illuminates the roof space in all areas of the church. Specific features have also been highlighted, such as the pulpit and lectern, along with the font.

The main focus of the church – which is the altar and sanctuary – has been illuminated using a mixture of wide, medium and narrow beam fittings, specifically directed to provide high illumination within that area and creating a focal point for those looking forward from the nave.

The lighting is operated automatically upon entrance through the south porch. Any one of 10 scenes can then be selected from a simple push-button control plate. Each scene can be programmed to suit the needs of the church. The lighting can also be operated from anywhere within the church using a tablet or mobile phone.

Additional lighting was installed in the kitchen area at the west end of the north aisle and socket outlets installed on each side of the nave.